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B-25A/B "Mitchell"

Attack aircraft

Douglas

B-25A/B Mitchell

The North American B-25 Mitchell was an American designed twin-engined medium bomber, which was approved in September 1939,

Named in honor of US airpower proponent Brig. Gen. William "Billy" Mitchell, the B-25 served in every theater of World War II and was made in larger quantities than any other American twin-engine combat airplane.

As with all U.S. bombers in World War two, the development of the B-25 is marked by increasing armament, more armor, installation of self-sealing tanks, and, consequently, more weight. Until engines were correspondingly up-rated, performance inevitably suffered. Inadequate firepower in the nose and problems with gun turret installations, issues seen in many bombers, also challenged the Mitchell's designers. The B-25A included pilot armor and self-sealing tanks. The B-25B introduced the notoriously unsuccesful Bendix ventral turret.

'Mitchell' Specification
B-25 B-25A B-25B
Crew 5
Dimensions
Wing span, m(ft) 20.60 (67.6)
Wing area, m2(sq ft) 56.67 (610)
Lenght, m(ft) 16.49 (54.1) 16.49 (54.1) 16.13 (52.2)
Height, m(ft) 4.80 (15.7)
Weight:
Empty weight, kg(lb) 7,835 (17,273) 8,112 (17,883) 9,070 (19,996)
Loaded weight, kg(lb) 12290 (27,094) 12,290 (27,094) 12,907 (28,455)
Powerplant
Wright «Cyclone»
14-cyl. radials
2 Х GR-2600-A5B R-2600-9 R-2600-9
power, hp 2 Х 1600 2 Х 1700 2 Х 1700
Performance
Speed, km/h (mph) Max 534 (331) 509 (316) 485km/h (301)
at altitude, m(ft) 4,572 (15,000) 4,572 (15,000) 4,572 (15,000)
Service ceiling, m (ft) - 8230 (27.000) 7160 (23.490)
Max range, km (mis) 3218 (2,000) 2172 (1,350) 2100 (1,300)
Armament
Machine guns 7.6-mm (.30) 3 3 -
Machine guns 12.7-mm (.50) 1 1 5
Bombs, kg 1,316 (2,900 Ib) 1316 (2,900 Ib) 1316 (2,900 Ib)

More...

References

  • "Encyclopedia of military engineering" /Aerospace Publising/
  • "American warplanes of World War II" /under cor. David Donald/

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