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Yak-9T

Antitank Fighter

Yakovlev

The Yak-9T from 812 Fighter Wing  on which an autumn of 1943 lieutenant A.M. Mashenkin flied. © Michael Bykov

The Yak-9T from 812 Fighter Wing on which an autumn of 1943 lieutenant A.M. Mashenkin flied.

Development moved swiftly in Yakovlev's design office and in the winter of 1942-43 the antitank model Yak-9T was offered for evaluation (completed on 4 March 1943 by pilot V.Chomyakov). The major armament was the very powerful 37 mm NS-37 cannon with length of 3400 mm and ammunition of 32 shells. The aircraft featured a reinforced nose section, the cockpit canopy moved 400 mm rear wards and an improved VISH-105 SV propeller. Fuel capacity was increased up to 330 kg and maximum take off weight raised to 3025 kg. Compared to the Yak-9, the type's performance showed only a slight loss in vertical speed. A total of 2748 Yak-9Ts was built by Plant # 153 from March 1943 till June 1945.

The introduction of additional fuel tanks and larger oil tank was intended as an improvement to the aircraft's flight range characteristics. The Yak-9D powered with M-105PF engine, featured four 650L common volume fuel tanks and 48 kg oil tank. Having the same armament as the Yak-9 had, the Yak-9D showed flight radius of 1360 km and maximum takeoff weight of 3117 kg. However, usually because of weak radio equipment performance, the aircraft were not used with full fuel tanks. The long range capability was employed for bomber escort missions only. A total of 3058 Yak-9Ds were produced from March 1943 till June 1946.

Yak-9 Modifications
Yak-9 Yak-9T Yak-9D Yak-9P Yak-9M Yak-9U Yak-9P
Year of issue 1942 1943 1943 1944 1944 1944 1947
Dimensions
Length, m 8.5 8.66 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.55 8.55
Wing span, m 9.74 9.74 9.74 9.74 9.74 9.74 9.74
Wing area, m² 17.15 17.15 17.15 17.15 17.15 17.15 17.15
Wing loading, kg/mm² 167 176 182 196 181 187 207
Weight, kg:
Empty weight 2277 2298 2350 2382 2428 2512 2708
Maximum takeoff weight 2873 3025 3117 3356 3096 3204 3550
Powerplant
Engine M-105PF M-105PF M-105PF VK-105PF VK-105PF VK-107A VK-107A
Power, hp 1180 1180 1180 1180 1180 1500 1500
Power loading, kg/hp 2.43 2.56 2.64 2.84 2.62 2.14 2.37
Performance
Maximum speed, km/h at sea level 520 533 535 507 518 575 590
at altitude 599 597 591 562 573 572 550
m 4300 3250 3650 3750 3750 5000 5000
Time to 5000 m, min 5.1 5.5 6.1 6.5 6.1 5.0 5.8
Time of turn, sec 15-17 18-19 20 25-26 19-20 20 21
Service ceiling, m 11100 10000 9100 8600 9500 10650 10500
Service range, km 875 735 1360 880 950 675 1130
Armament
Cannon, 20-mm 1 1 1 1 1 1 5
Machine guns, 12.7-mm 1 1 1 1 1 2 -

Photo Description

The first Yak-9T during official state evaluations in February 1943. Note: firstly the aircraft had three joints at upper engine cowling with machine gun fairing. Later series were equipped with enlarged inner volume upper engine cowling. That's why it lost the fairing. Furthermore, the cooling got four joints.

An Omsk-built Yak-9UT (s/n 40166022) seen during manufacturer's flight tests. The aircraft looked like a cross between the Yak-9U and the tank-busting Yak-9K. The muzzle brake of the 37-mm engine-mounted cannon is well visible, as is the dorsal carburettor air intake moved aft to a position about halfway between the spinner and the windscreen. Because of the Yak-9UT's strike role a bulletproof windshield was a must.

Above and below: The same Yak-9UT c/n 40166022 on a snow-covered airfield during State acceptance trials. Note that carburettor air intake has now reverted to its original lacation immediately aft of the spinner.

Above and below" Yak-9UT c/n 40166074 is unusual in lacking the cannon muzzle brake.

References

  • "Yak-9: Private soldiers of heavens" /Dmitriy Leipnik/
  • "The history of designs of planes in USSR 1938-1950" /Vadim Shavrov/
  • "Planes of Stalin falcons" /Konstantin Kosminkov and Dmitriy Grinyuk/
  • "Stories of the aircraft designer" /Alexander Yakovlev/
  • "The Soviet planes" /Alexander Yakovlev/

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