Aviation of WWII
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RAAF RNZAF

The Royal Australian Air Force & Royal New Zealand Air Force in the Pacific

Rene J. Francillon, Ph.D

Photo Description

CA-13 Boomerang ---- A46-128, BF-N ---- from No. 5 Squadron over Bougainville Island in 1944.
(via Frank Smith).

Mechanics from No. 5 Squadron servicing the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 S3C4-G of a Boomerang in the hot and humid atmosphere prevailing on Bougainville.
(RAAF Official).

This CA-19 Boomerang—A46-217, QE-G "Hep Cat"----from No. 4 Squadron swung off the strip at Cape Hoskins on 11 February 1945. The aircraft was later salvaged and flew with No. 5 Squadron.
(RAAF Official).

Named "Olga" this CA-13 Boomerang from No. 4 Squadron was photographed at Sepinggang Airfield on 25 July 1945 during operations around Balikpapan. Aircraft coded QE-N and bearing identification number A46-121.
(USAF).

B-25D from No. 2 Squadron at Batchelor, N.T., in 1944.
(via Frank Smith).

A47-36 "Z" from No. 2 Squadron seen at Batchelor, NT. prior to a sortie over the Dutch East Indies sometime in 1944.
(via Frank Smith).

Three B-25D's and one B-25J from No. 2 Squadron at Hughes Strip, Northern Australia, in December 1944.
(via Frank Smith).

A47-44, a B-25J-25-NC (ex 44-30896), over Brisbane in 1945. This aircraft was received by the RAAF on 28 April 1945 and did not see operational service.
(Australian War Memorial).

Two Mitchells—N5-139, a B-25C-NA, and N5-140, a B-25D-NA—from No. 18 Squadron (NEI) flying to Batchelor, N.T., in 1943.
(via Frank Smith).

N5-141, a B-25D-NC from No. 18 Squadron (NEI). This aircraft crash landed at Mascot, N.S.W., on 7 November 1944.
(Australian War Memorial).

Kingfishers at No. 3 O.T.U., Rathmines, N.S.W., in August 1942. The aircraft on the ground, A48-S, was lost at sea on 14 January 1943.
(Australian War Memorial).

A48-12, a Kingfisher from No. 107 Squadron at Rathmines, N.S.W., in 1944.
(via Frank Smith).

A51-10, an ex Royal Netherland Indies Army Air Corps' Brewster B-339D Buffalo, which served with No. 25 Squadron and is seen here as it appeared at Pearce, W.A., in 1942.
(via Frank Smith).

Only seventeen Buffaloes received Australian identification numbers and the RAAF association with the type is better remembered for the use in Malaya by that Service of Buffaloes which retained their British serial numbers.
(Australian War Memorial).

On 7 December 1941 the Commonwealth forces in Malaya had 114 Buffaloes on strength and 62 of these aircraft were operated by No. 243 Squadron (RAF), No. 488 Squadron (NZ) and Nos. 21 and 453 Squadrons (RAAF) while the 52 other Buffaloes were held in reserve.
(Australian War Memorial).

Indicative of the over confidence with which the Allies prepared themselves for the war against Japan, the Brewster Buffalo—which had already been found obsolete in the war against Germany and Italy—was selected to provide air defense over Singapore and the Malay Peninsula.
(Australian War Memorial}.

Brewster Buffaloes from No. 453 Squadron neatly aligned at Sembawang Airfield, Singapore, shortly before the Japanese amphibious operations against Malaya.
(Australian War Memorial).


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